Mental Health Awareness Week 2020

Hosted by the Mental Health Foundation, Mental Health Awareness Week will take place from 18-24 May 2020. The theme is kindness.

Our challenge is all about being kind to yourself by taking some time out each day for yourself.

We are asking you to be active for 30 minutes a day, which may include running, walking and cycling, but this does not have to be strenuous – you can do the gardening or get those arm muscles moving by baking a cake. Whatever your physical ability, this challenge is for everyone.

What sort of activities can I do?

  • HIIT, Pilates, Yoga – whatever exercise floats your boat that day.
  • Walking – it's great to try and get some fresh air everyday so why not incorporate this into your challenge?
  • Baking – get your sweat on in the kitchen by cooking up a storm.
  • Gardening – this can be a great workout too!
  • Ultimately, you can get creative in this challenge by taking on whichever form of movement makes you happy (personally we think dancing in your kitchen is a good one!)
The Mental Health Foundation works to prevent mental health problems.  

We will drive change towards a mentally healthy society for all, and support communities, families and individuals to live mentally healthier lives, with a particular focus on those at greatest risk.  

The Mental Health Foundation is the home of Mental Health Awareness Week

What is Mental Health Awareness Week?

Mental health problems can affect anyone, at any time. We believe that mental health is everyone’s business. 

So, for one week each May, we campaign around a specific theme for Mental Health Awareness Week. 

Since our first Mental Health Awareness Week in 2001, we’ve raised awareness of topics like body image, stress and relationships.  

The campaign reaches millions of people every year. This year, with your support, we want to reach more people than ever. 

Why kindness?

 

One thing that we have seen all over the world is that kindness is prevailing in uncertain times.  

We have learnt that amid the fear, there is also community, support and hope. 

The added benefit of helping others is that it is good for our own mental health and wellbeing. It can help reduce stress and improve your emotional wellbeing. 

Beyond ourselves, our report reveals how inequality is rising in our society and its harmful effects on our health.  

Life expectancy is falling for the poorest for the first time in 100 years. As child poverty rises, children and young people in the poorest parts of our country are two to three times more likely to experience poor mental health than those in the richest.  

After the 2008 credit crunch it was the most vulnerable in our communities who experienced the severest consequences of austerity, with devastating effects on their mental and physical health. This not the hallmark of a kind society.  

We must not make the same mistakes after this pandemic.